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Tommy Koh
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Tommy Koh, (Tommy Thong-Bee Koh or Tommy Koh Thong Bee) was born in Singapore on 12 November 1937. He is an international lawyer, professor and Ambassador-At-Large for the Government of Singapore. He is Professor of Law at the National University of Singapore, and Chairman of the Singapore Institute of Policy Studies and the Chairman of the Governing Board of Singapore's Centre for International Law (CIL). He was President of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, 1980-1982 and Chairman of the Main Committee of the UN Conference on Environment and Development, 1990-1992, where he presided over the negotiations on Agenda 21. He has also served as Singapore's ambassador to the United Nations and the United States.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 27.01.2020
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Challenges for Mountain Regions
49,00 € *
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Mountains make up around a third of the surface area of the world's mainland and islands. While they are home to one tenth of the world's population, they provide resources to more than a third of all humans. Mountain areas are hotspots of biodiversity as well as offering recreation, or even recuperation after an illness, for many people. There is cause for concern as global change in the form of climate change and as globalization threatens mountain areas more intensely than lowlands. Global warming in the mountains occurs up to three times faster than elsewhere and has highly diverse effects. Globalization is hitting ill prepared traditional areas that are hard pressed to hold their own against global competition. Mountain ranges often run across national boundaries and possess conflict potential. At international level and with diminishing resources, these conflicts can arise around minerals and water. At national level, the inaccessibility of some mountain areas makes them a potential shelter for terrorists. For these reasons, mountain research is now becoming all the more important. The aim must be to maintain the functions of mountains and to introduce sustainable development processes. The UN has recognized this by passing the resolution "Sustainable Mountain Development". It adds to the mountain chapter of the Agenda 21 and to the declaration of an International Year of the Mountains in 2002 and 2010. This volume shows that Austrian mountain research is taking up the challenge of global change for mountain regions. The authors are, or have been, members of the Institute of Mountain Research: Man and Environment at the Austrian Academy of Sciences or are working closely with the institute. Readers who love the mountains will find here a new, more problem-oriented, view of these fascinating landscapes.

Anbieter: Dodax AT
Stand: 27.01.2020
Zum Angebot
Challenges for Mountain Regions
49,00 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Mountains make up around a third of the surface area of the world's mainland and islands. While they are home to one tenth of the world's population, they provide resources to more than a third of all humans. Mountain areas are hotspots of biodiversity as well as offering recreation, or even recuperation after an illness, for many people. There is cause for concern as global change in the form of climate change and as globalization threatens mountain areas more intensely than lowlands. Global warming in the mountains occurs up to three times faster than elsewhere and has highly diverse effects. Globalization is hitting ill prepared traditional areas that are hard pressed to hold their own against global competition. Mountain ranges often run across national boundaries and possess conflict potential. At international level and with diminishing resources, these conflicts can arise around minerals and water. At national level, the inaccessibility of some mountain areas makes them a potential shelter for terrorists. For these reasons, mountain research is now becoming all the more important. The aim must be to maintain the functions of mountains and to introduce sustainable development processes. The UN has recognized this by passing the resolution "Sustainable Mountain Development". It adds to the mountain chapter of the Agenda 21 and to the declaration of an International Year of the Mountains in 2002 and 2010. This volume shows that Austrian mountain research is taking up the challenge of global change for mountain regions. The authors are, or have been, members of the Institute of Mountain Research: Man and Environment at the Austrian Academy of Sciences or are working closely with the institute. Readers who love the mountains will find here a new, more problem-oriented, view of these fascinating landscapes.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 27.01.2020
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Getting to Grips with Green Plans
32,90 CHF *
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One of the more significant recommendations to emerge from UNCED in 1992 was the call in Agenda 21 for countries to develop and implement national sustainable development strategies. Most countries have responded to this challenge. However many countries also have a long history of drawing up planning exercises at this level to deal with environmental problems. 'Green planning' is now used as a shorthand term for a range of such national-level planning initiatives covering both sustainable development and environmental concerns, and countries from the North and the South can benefit from a pooling of knowledge. Getting to Grips with Greens Plans presents a cogent analysis of industrial countries' experiences in this area, drawing out lessons and observations from broad empirical experience. Part 1 provides an overview of national green planning, reviewing its origins and scope, identifying popular approaches and common processes, highlighting important issues such as participation, the influence of domestic politics, and the track record of more ambitious regional plans, and comparing approaches in developed and developing countries. Part 2 goes on to present a series of detailed case studies, drawn largely from interviews with key individuals responsible for coordinating national green planning processes. These cases come from a range of Western and Eastern European countries, the US and Canada, and Australia and New Zealand. Some of these case studies show impressive records of achievement, whilst others demonstrate potential stumbling blocks. All demonstrate the difficulty of putting the concept of sustainable development into practiceBarry Dalal-Clayton is director of the Environmental Planning Group at the International Institute for Environment and Development, London. In recent years, Dr Dalal Clayton has been deeply involved in analyzing approaches to national sustainable development strategies and environmental action plans in many countries, and in advising governments and international agencies in this field. His other current research interests include environmental impact assessment, community-based wildlife management and land use planning. Originally published in 1996

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 27.01.2020
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Getting to Grips with Green Plans
27,49 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

One of the more significant recommendations to emerge from UNCED in 1992 was the call in Agenda 21 for countries to develop and implement national sustainable development strategies. Most countries have responded to this challenge. However many countries also have a long history of drawing up planning exercises at this level to deal with environmental problems. 'Green planning' is now used as a shorthand term for a range of such national-level planning initiatives covering both sustainable development and environmental concerns, and countries from the North and the South can benefit from a pooling of knowledge. Getting to Grips with Greens Plans presents a cogent analysis of industrial countries' experiences in this area, drawing out lessons and observations from broad empirical experience. Part 1 provides an overview of national green planning, reviewing its origins and scope, identifying popular approaches and common processes, highlighting important issues such as participation, the influence of domestic politics, and the track record of more ambitious regional plans, and comparing approaches in developed and developing countries. Part 2 goes on to present a series of detailed case studies, drawn largely from interviews with key individuals responsible for coordinating national green planning processes. These cases come from a range of Western and Eastern European countries, the US and Canada, and Australia and New Zealand. Some of these case studies show impressive records of achievement, whilst others demonstrate potential stumbling blocks. All demonstrate the difficulty of putting the concept of sustainable development into practiceBarry Dalal-Clayton is director of the Environmental Planning Group at the International Institute for Environment and Development, London. In recent years, Dr Dalal Clayton has been deeply involved in analyzing approaches to national sustainable development strategies and environmental action plans in many countries, and in advising governments and international agencies in this field. His other current research interests include environmental impact assessment, community-based wildlife management and land use planning. Originally published in 1996

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 27.01.2020
Zum Angebot